21 4 / 2014

futurerevolutions asked: What exactly are the approximate races of Alana and Marko? Like it's a fantasy/sci-fi deal so I know they're aliens but, let's be real, I seriously doubt the team would stray from this kind of question since they write a comic like this and the artist is an ~awake~ WoC?????

fionastaples:

benrankel:

sagacomic:

“This is an original fantasy book with no superheroes, two non-white leads and an opening chapter featuring graphic robot sex. I thought we might be cancelled by our third issue.”

- Brian K. Vaughan (x)

Both Brian and Fiona have repeatedly said that their heroes are PoC. And of course it’s clear from Fiona’s illustrations that neither Alana nor Marko are white, but that Alana has darker skin than Marko.

The only featured/recurring character in the Saga universe who actually seems to have white skin is The Stalk.

However, I still come across white-washed Saga fan art and fancasting posts, which never cease to amaze and infuriate me. No matter how pretty the art, I will never repost that shit.

If people genuinely see these characters as white, they need to check their eyesight or their racism. And I doubt the optometrist will find any deficiencies.

Thanks for the ask. I haven’t had a good rant on this subject in a while!

Personal pet peeve is folks who think Marko is white. He ain’t.

Marko is meant to be Asian- more specifically, I combined features from a handful of Japanese models and actors when I was designing him. I can see why people sometimes mistake him for white, because I avoided using exaggerated racial markers (slanted eyes, rounded nose, etc). With simple cartoon drawings like these, a lot is left to the reader’s imagination. So I accept there will be some misidentification because I didn’t draw Marko’s family like Mulan characters, haha.

I see Alana as having mixed heritage. When I drew her father I was envisioning an Indian man. Her mother remains a mystery!

image

21 4 / 2014

pyreo:

swan2swan:

"You’e weak! And I’ve outgrown you."

My brother called me yesterday with a stunning revelation he’d had about this scene: intentional or not, this is a perfect commentary on the superhero genre of today, and about one of its greatest weaknesses.

He’s calling Mr. Incredible weak here because the man refused to do one thing—and that was to kill someone. And because he sees him as being unable to kill, he sees him as weak—and childish. “I’ve outgrown you.” Now he is in the realm of “mature” superheroes, where Superman has to snap a man’s neck and Catwoman has to shoot Bane, where the purity of a woman forged by clay is unrelatable and marriage is nonconducive to an interesting story. His is a world where superheroes die to make villains seem impressive, a world where a dark and gritty realism is more important than a fun and adventurous fantasy. 

In the end of this movie, though, the Omnidroid isn’t beaten by Mr. Incredible finding Syndrome and beating an explanation out of him to stop the robot; they solve it through brainwork, audacity, and a fun and creative action sequence. Syndrome dies in the end, yes, but that’s primarily because he keeps trying to push his view, and ends up destroying himself.

But this is Syndrome being Zack Snyder or Frank Miller, and believing that the fun adventures of yesteryear are childish fantasies that need to be left behind: ours is a world where to relate to a superhero, we have to see that superhero be unable to accomplish his task completely, where he has to settle and accept a compromise in order to preserve the greater good. We can’t admire them for being able to do what we cannot—we have to grow up and see that they’re just like us, they’re nothing special. Not really. And that is what true maturity is. A truly mature Avatar would kill the Firelord, a truly mature Superman would have no choice but to fight in the middle of a city, and video games need to be about cover-based shooting and military combat in the real world. With quick-time-events!

And of course, that’s all complete bullcrap, and the sooner that mentality gets sucked into a jet engine, the happier I’ll be. 

Yes, YES, absolutely. I love the philosophy behind this movie in celebrating the light, warm, wholesome side of superheroism.

And I love how well Syndrome represents basically ‘toxic nerd culture’. When he can’t see superheroes as people he relates to any more, he regresses and sees them as playthings instead. He acts like these real people are action figures for him to do with as he pleases, as visually demonstrated by the scenes where he holds people in zero-point stasis and moves them about, frozen in stationary action poses.

He refuses to accept any perspective but his own. He talks about the superheroes like they’re comic book characters to him - like when he finds out Mr Incredible and Elastigirl got married, or in the interrogation scenes where he seems to be critiquing the ‘new’ Mr Incredible and berating him for having let him down. He talks about it like it’s a character reboot he doesn’t agree with. Plus his whole mantra of providing (selling) superpowers to everybody, so nobody will be ‘special’ any more, entirely designed to take away the specialness of what he coveted and couldn’t have, just as many guys entrenched in nerd culture refuse to let anyone else share it and act like it’s a secret club only for them.

Syndrome represents arrested fanboy development in which he refused to grow up. He carries this resentment from childhood all because his favourite hero actually had other things to do with his life than to cater to him. Mature people have responsibilities, actual jobs, they age and have families of their own, that’s what mature means and it’s what Mr and Mrs Incredible stand for, and everything that Syndrome echews in favour of being somebody’s ‘arch-nemesis’. He still thinks that maturity is dark, brooding, sexy (I mean the person he picked as the front for his scheme, not him), and about how much collateral damage you can cause. But he’s just a manchild living out a comic book dream, creating his own fictional life story (his robot is designed to be impervious to superpowers and stage a disaster that only he can defuse, thus saving the day - the whole thing is playing pretend and endangering thousands of people’s lives). Kids like to play at being heroes and stopping disasters, but because he refused to grow out of any of this, he acquired the means to do it for real and became a murderer in the process. All because he couldn’t accept that he was, essentially, wrong. By refusing to believe that his childlike hero-worship was over the top, he buckled down into it and continued to play pretend as a child would. Another aspect of maturity is natural change and Syndrome rejects it just as Mr Incredible and all the other supers accepted their reprimand (by having to go undercover and live as normal people) and adapted to it even though they didn’t want to.

My favourite line in the whole film is when Bob threatens him and Syndrome shrugs it off saying, “Nah, that’s a little dark for you,” because he’s all at once criticising Mr Incredible’s ‘character’, evaluating a real person in front of him as though he has him pegged on a morality chart, and you know he could back it up with some creepy nerd facts like “In 1964 you said the same thing to Lord Heatwave and you were totally bluffing”, as though Bob is predictable, unchanging, completely fictional to him, AND he’s being dismissive of Bob’s personal life, he thinks Mr Incredible’s gone soft, weak, become a family man, because he thinks his former hero needs to be cool and gritty and running away from explosions, not an actual person with depth and goals and feelings - which is, of course, why we as an audience like Mr Incredible and his whole family, thereby proving Syndrome and the Dark Gritty Reboot culture wrong simply by having watched and enjoyed the movie they were in.

(via evilmarguerite)

16 4 / 2014

kanthara:

ask-blood-soaked-pancakes:

caitlincst:

kingforhermione:

rox1108:

007-reporting:

angelsontheearth:

17851

That’s disgusting.

Well done society.

Well done.

20,299.

148,628

170,488

I swear if this gets any more notes then I fear for the next generation.

389,556

Dear God

448, 916

I’m surprised this rapidly increasing number is news to anyone. 

(Source: nickastig.me, via adrianalikestea)

15 4 / 2014

manhattanclantechie:

[[Literally the point where Gargoyles became my favourite show.]]

(Source: noworries-justdisney, via jigglykat)

13 4 / 2014

postcardsfromspace:

THIS IS HAPPENING!

rachelandmiles:

And we’re live!

Click through to download Rachel and Miles X-Plain the X-Men #1, in which we begin at the beginning: everything clicks with #3, Professor Xavier is a jerk, Magneto is a fearless fashionista, Cyclops gets a name, Jean Grey has a chronic case of the Silver Age, and allegorical diversity is not enough.

X-Plained:

  • Mutant genetics and taxonomy
  • Practical semantics of “X-Men”
  • Charles Xavier’s equally dubious ethics and decorating choices
  • Superhero couture of the Atomic Age
  • Why Cyclops can’t control his powers
  • The miracle of comic-book magnetism
  • A problematic analogy
  • X-books for beginners
  • Snow grenades
  • The word “yaybo”
  • The mystery of the ubiquitous plaid suit

12 4 / 2014

fozmeadows:

nothingman:

via http://www.listen-tome.com/save-me/

IT’S 2AM AND I’M LAUGHING WAY TOO LOUD HELP

fozmeadows:

nothingman:

via http://www.listen-tome.com/save-me/

IT’S 2AM AND I’M LAUGHING WAY TOO LOUD HELP

(via jasonenright)

11 4 / 2014

gimpnelly:

Doing a survey about sexual harassment in comics. Please respond, share, etc. as much as you can and I will owe you one for life.

08 4 / 2014

postcardsfromspace:

Fifty years of continuity. Two nerds. One podcast.

Because you demanded it:

08 4 / 2014

postcardsfromspace:

onipress:

A statement to ULine, our former office supply vendor. Basic human rights trump deals on office supplies any day of the week.

Well done.

postcardsfromspace:

onipress:

A statement to ULine, our former office supply vendor. Basic human rights trump deals on office supplies any day of the week.

Well done.

08 4 / 2014

enthusiamy:

geekandsundry:

In which Amy Dallen and the creative minds behind Lumberjanes make friendship bracelets and talk about comics. <3 Pick it up tomorrow to support these amazing new comic creators! 

This episode was a huge joy.

RATHER LIKE THE COMIC IS GOING TO BE.

Shannon and Noelle were amazing guests!

Everyone must read Lumberjanes!

07 4 / 2014

cowbuttcrunchies:

Cowbutt Crunchies Cosplay Fandom Hoodie Giveaway

What the hell, guys.

We hit a really big number so it’s time for another giveaway as a thank-you to all of our awesome followers!  We’re going to reprise the last giveaway by giving one winner a custom Fandom Hoodie of their choice!  This hoodie may be from any series and of any character or OC, and will be sewn in the style of our God Tier and other Fandom Hoodies.   All of our hoodies are made from multiple layers of sweatshirt fleece, home-dyed, and sized to fit.

The rules are:

  • Tumblr likes and reblogs count as one entry each.  No sideblogs please.  We do check.
  • We’re trying to be good at maintaining our Facebook account too, so you may enter again by liking and sharing the post on our Facebook page!
  • You do need to be following our Tumblr and/or Facebook page to win!  If you’re not following us already, this blog is 100% weird cosplay shenanigans and tutorials so check us out maybe if you’re not?
  • We will randomly a select a winner, but if you don’t respond within 48 hours we will choose the next person on the list.  International shipping is a-okay.

Check out this post if you have any questions, or send us an ask off-anon!  The giveaway will end on May 31st, 2014.  Good luck!!

02 4 / 2014

bobzenub:

Charles and Erik finally reconcile

bobzenub:

Charles and Erik finally reconcile

(via gingerhaze)

02 4 / 2014

(Source: duss005)

26 3 / 2014

postcardsfromspace:

(Also at the Medium.)

image

I’m in my therapist’s office, talking about friendship. I’ve been struggling with emotional intimacy and honesty—my whole life, actually, but it’s caused some more acute problems recently, which is why I’m back here now. In more practical terms, I’m here because my…

24 3 / 2014

laughterkey:

cumaeansibyl:

this is legit btw
I mean, there were folkloric heroes like Robin Hood before the Scarlet Pimpernel, but they didn’t really do the secret identity — people might not have known Robin Hood’s real identity but he wasn’t out living a double life and his costume was just what he and his buds wore in the forest, whereas the Pimpernel was actually doing the exact same thing as Bruce Wayne (pampered aristocrat by day, avenging hero by night)
also I wanna point out that the Scarlet Pimpernel was actually the leader of a league of twenty people also living double lives — Baroness Orczy also invented the first superhero team

Also The Scarlet Pimpernel is goddamned amazing and if you’ve never read it you’re missing out.

laughterkey:

cumaeansibyl:

this is legit btw

I mean, there were folkloric heroes like Robin Hood before the Scarlet Pimpernel, but they didn’t really do the secret identity — people might not have known Robin Hood’s real identity but he wasn’t out living a double life and his costume was just what he and his buds wore in the forest, whereas the Pimpernel was actually doing the exact same thing as Bruce Wayne (pampered aristocrat by day, avenging hero by night)

also I wanna point out that the Scarlet Pimpernel was actually the leader of a league of twenty people also living double lives — Baroness Orczy also invented the first superhero team

Also The Scarlet Pimpernel is goddamned amazing and if you’ve never read it you’re missing out.

(Source: geekmehard, via postcardsfromspace)